minimal | clean lines | lack of ornamentation | contrast | revealed structure | innovative | undisguised materials | functional | playful | open floor plan | contemporary l |iving with nature | organic | non-traditional | pure form | timeless

sustainability

A Louvered Beach House on the Arabian Sea

Built on a coconut plantation outside of Mumbai, India, on the Arabian Sea, Studio Mumbai’s Palmyra House is a place of refuge, not only from the city but also from people (houseguests possibly included). The 3,000-square-foot setup is split into two wooden louvered structures, each constructed using local traditional methods and wood. One building contains the living room, study, and master bedroom; the other houses the kitchen, dining room, and guest bedrooms. And should the occupants be feeling convivial, there’s a long, thin pool, perfect for swims together while sharing the expansive views out to the sea.

Photography by Helene Binet via ArchDaily, unless otherwise noted.

Hanway, C. (2015, May 27). Architect Visit: A Louvered Beach House on the Arabian Sea: Remodelista. Retrieved June 3, 2015, from http://www.remodelista.com/posts/architect-visit-a-louvered-beach-house-on-the-arabian-sea-studio-mumbai-palmyra-house


Small-Space Living: 13 Radical Tiny Cottages

I spent the first 18 years of my life occupying Harry Potter–size quarters in an otherwise spacious house—and feeling as if I was the lucky one. And though I’ve since gained a bit more elbow room, I’ve been gratified to watch the tiny house movement mushroom in the past decade. (And yet frequently let down by the twee hippie-gnome lairs that await beyond so many downsized front doors.) More architects ought to join the downsizing crusade—but, fortunately, enough have that the seeds of first-rate minuscule design have been planted. Here are some standouts, many of them from Remodelista and Gardenista’s own greatest-hits archive.

N.B.: One man’s hut is another’s palace. We tend to be generous in our definition of tiny: Our selections here range in size but most are under 300 square feet.

Guralnick, M. (2015, May 20). Small-Space Living: 13 Radical Tiny Cottages. Retrieved May 21, 2015, from http://www.remodelista.com/posts/small-space-living-13-radical-tiny-cottages-designed-by-architects?utm_source=Remodelista/Gardenista Subscriber List&utm_campaign=d26f58a198-Remodelista Daily Mail Campaign&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_447a717cea-d26f58a1


The Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture

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The Caterpillar House is a strange but beautiful combination of styles and influences. It is essentially a modern reinterpretation of a ranch-style house. At the same time, the mid-century influence is very strong. The idea of combining all these elements is an odd one but, when you think about it, these styles might not have much in common but combined they result in a well-balanced and original composition.

The house only has one level. This makes it long and close to the ground. If we also take into consideration the choice of materials and the architectural elements, we can say that the Caterpillar House integrates naturally into the surroundings. It’s almost as if it were there from the beginning of time. Given the fact that this is a ranch-style house, the close indoor-outdoor connection should be a given. The house rises from the ground and grass and becomes a part of the landscape.

Internally, the Caterpillar house is open planned. This is only one of the features of modern design. It has wood-paneled ceilings throughout, a feature that also continues outside, creating a continuous design. The interior thus becomes cozy and warm but also casual and elegant. Most of the furniture is also made of wood and features a modern and simple design. Also, the house is sustainable and beautiful at the same time.  (Ganea)

Ganea, Simona. “The Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture.” Homedit. N.p., 15 Jul 2012. Web. 16 Jul. 2012. <http://www.homedit.com/the-caterpillar-house-feldman-architecture/&gt;.

 


Vertical Garden

via Remodelista

Outdoor walls become eye-catching gardens with our hanging wool pocket planters. Framed in a rustic wood, these unusual plant pockets make a striking statement and a convenient kitchen garden when planted with your favorite herbs or berries. These UV resistant 100% recycled fiber felt wall planters are made with reused plastic water bottles, making them a sustainable addition to your outdoor landscape.   (Remodelista)

Remodelista, . Long vertical garden [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://remodelista.com/products/long-vertical-garden


‘Lotus’

Black Line One X Architecture Studio

This concept approaches the entire site as a contributor to the landscape rather than  individual plots of land where single residences float randomly within an undesignated, un-specified space.    (Black Line One X Architecture Studio)

 

Black Line One X Architecture Studio, . (n.d.). lotus – entry awarded 3rd place in international design competition. Retrieved from http://bloxas.com.au/architects/?page_id=169


A Vision of Temporary Living

 

Photo: Florian Berger, Hannes Meraner, Werner Aisslinger

Fincube / 2008
Team: Studio Aisslinger

Ñnatural high-techì is the concept of this new modular, sustainable & transportable low-energy house.  Designed by Werner Aisslinger and developed with a South Tyrolian team, the FINCUBE was created 1200m above sea level near Bozen in Northern Italy, with a brilliant view of the famous Dolomite mountains.  The hideaway-innature nomadic housing concept is since recently exhibited as a prototype in Ritten, above Bozen.

Sustainable Nomadic House:
Made entirely of local wood, the building provides 47 m2 of living space with a minimal CO2 footprint using long-lasting and recyclable materials from  local suppliers and local crafts, manufactured with the precision and care of tyrolese handwork.  The FINCUBE is a materialized vision of a small housing unit with a long lifecycle.  It can easily be dismantled and rebuilt on a new site, and even more important for nature hideaways: it requires minimum soil sealing – just 2 m2 that are easily renatured after the FINCUBE is moved to another location.

Long-lasting Design:
The design is minimal, material-orientated, and in close touch with nature – the wooden space with a 360-degree triple glazing is furnished with a second facade layer, producing shade and giving the building a unique overall mushroom-like monoshape.  The horizontal ledges give privacy to the FINCUBE and embed the building into forests, meadows, mountain sides or any nature resorts.  The combination of long-lasting design and the option of changing its location after a while make the FINCUBE a flexible home or hideaway and a lifetime companion.

Hospitality Vision:
Together with South Tyrolean hotelier Josef Innherhofer, the fincube was also conceptualized as a vision for future hospitality: a temporary FINCUBE village with minimum soil sealing can be placed in the middle of the most beautiful landscapes without permanently altering them.  In contrast to all permanent buildings it could be easily changed, extended, scaled down or removed and the area would soon be renaturalized back to normal. These qualities turn the unit into an answer to future needs of flexible and smart tourism.

Technology & Space:
Technology wise the FINCUBE is a smart house – all vital house-functions are controlled by a central touchpanel.  The supporting structure is made of local larch and the interior is a combination of larch & stone-pine. The 3m-high space is organized in a helical structure: the entrance area blends into a generous open kitchen with an adjacent sofa living space, around the corner one enters the bedroom and further down is the spacious bathroom. 

(Studio Aisslinger)
 

Potrero House / San Francisco, CA

The modern vernacular vocabulary of the architecture celebrates the singular qualities of this special urban environment.   (Bernstein)

Bernstein, C. (n.d.). Potrero House, San Francisco, CA . Retrieved from http://www.cbstudio.com/projects/res-potrero1-2.html