minimal | clean lines | lack of ornamentation | contrast | revealed structure | innovative | undisguised materials | functional | playful | open floor plan | contemporary l |iving with nature | organic | non-traditional | pure form | timeless

Environment

“The Chameleon”

When you imagine a trip to Bali, you may think first of lying on white sand beaches in the shade of tall palms. But a bit away from the water is where the magic can really happen. The jungles of Bali are rich with greenery and wildlife — and if you’re lucky enough, you may even find yourself at one of the island’s most luxurious estates, nestled right into that jungle. The home featured here is just such a retreat. Featuring a sparkling clear infinity pool, an outdoor bath, and plenty of indoor space for the long and luxurious evening of a vacation, this home is a true treasure, as you’ll see in the photos from photographer Daniel Koh.

http://www.home-designing.com/a-bali-jungle-retreat-surrounded-by-lush-greenery?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+home-designing+%28Home+Design+Ideas%29


What Is Mid-Century Modern, and Why Do We Love It So Much?

We all know that styles are cyclical and, of course, the world of interior design is not exempt. The best aesthetics will be popular again and again. Right now, mid-century-modern design is making a comeback and, if you ask us, it’s for good reason.

What is it about this aesthetic that keeps us coming back for more over half a century later? We’ll tell you why mid-century modern will never really leave us — and how to work the style into your interiors while making sure they are rooted in the new millennium. After all, sometimes the old way of doing things really is the right way.

What Is Mid-Century Modern?

If you’ve ever seen an episode of Mad Men, you’re already familiar with mid-century-modern design. In fact, the term was coined in 1984 by author Cara Greenberg. She used it to discuss the signature looks of the 1960s in her book Mid-Century Modern: Furniture of the 1950s.

Though the moniker has become a bit broad in the past few decades, it’s most commonly used to refer to the styles that became popular in a post-World War II landscape. While there may be a few variations, most people agree that this time period extends from 1945-1969.

Interestingly, this style doesn’t just refer to aspects of interior design. It is commonly used as a descriptor for any architecture, furniture,  accessories, materials and technologies that grew in popularity after the end of the war.

It Showcases Simplicity

When you look at design projects that follow a mid-century-modern style, the one thing you won’t see is tons of excess. Rather than requiring a bunch of ornate embellishments, the mid-century look is all about stripping items down to their barest elements and letting their function become the star.

Keep this in mind when it comes to choosing the items that will fill your space. Look for furniture that has clean lines and, if needed, multiple uses. Stick to décor items that are modern or geometric in their aesthetic.

This concept should also be taken into account when it comes to designing the layout of your space. Rather than cluttering up the room, focus on choosing one strong focal area that will dictate the room’s function. For example, consider using a statement table in your dining room or creating an inviting seating area in your living room. Then, don’t be afraid to step back and allow negative space to play a key role in your design.

It Lets Us Play With Color

Of course, when you focus on bringing simplistic shapes into your space, it becomes necessary to add a layer of visual interest elsewhere. The mid-century-modern look does that by incorporating bold pops of color. Brooke Schneider, a designer based in Long Beach, Calif., explains it best:

“When homeowners think ‘color,’ they often think of the bright hues of the mid-century time period. With clear, cheerful colors, the 1950s exhibited a new American outlook of optimism that was comfortably removed from the drab war years.”

Don’t be afraid to go big with shades like blueberry, citron or fire-engine red. Just be sure to avoid mixing multiple loud colors like they did in that time period. Doing so might make your space look more outdated than retro-inspired. Instead, focus on tempering one colorful statement piece with more neutral hues to ensure a modern twist on this style of design.

It Connects Us With Nature

Since mid-century-modern design is all about simplicity, it makes sense that this school of style would harbor a strong connection to nature. In particular, those who are looking for ways to embrace sustainable design may be interested in what this aesthetic has to offer.

First, it’s important to consider how nature can affect the layout of the space. In mid-century architecture, large windows often play a key role. But anyone can work off those principles by making windows the focal point of your space whenever possible and making sure that they stay unencumbered from heavy drapery.

As for the design elements to fill your space, focus on choosing items made from natural materials such as wood, metal and leather or cotton textiles. Don’t be afraid to bring the outside in by adding greenery to accent your design.

There’s a reason why mid-century-modern design is present in our consciousness after over a half-century since its debut. Whether it’s the clean lines, bold colors or connection to nature, this school of style is currently making a big comeback in interior design.

“What Is Mid-Century Modern? – Freshome.” Freshomecom What Is MidCentury Modern and Why Do We Love It So Much Comments. 8 Oct. 2015. Web. 8 Oct. 2015. <http://freshome.com/mid-century-modern/&gt;.

This Floor Is Made Of Broken Shards Of Glass

Gisele Taranto Architecture has partnered with LZ Studio to create a laboratory of ideas – LAB LZ by GT. This partnership has resulted in a space that has been designed specifically for Casa Cor Rio.

Currently on show until October 4th at Villa Aymoré, Casa Cor Rio invites architects and designers to design their spaces, like a fashion show, using a lot of creativity and seeking to present to the public the biggest releases of materials, technologies and design concepts.

This year, LAB LZ by GT, have designed a space with a suspended glass floor, featuring mirror shards located in the empty space between the existing subfloor and finished floor.

The designers used the mirrors to highlight the concept of depth and reflection that they were aiming to achieve with this interior.

Collaborators: Maneco Quinderé (Lighting), Vanda Klabin (curating art) and Landscape (landscaping)
“This Floor Is Made Of Broken Shards Of Glass.” CONTEMPORIST. 17 Sept. 2015. Web. 21 Sept. 2015. <http://www.contemporist.com/2015/09/18/this-floor-is-made-of-broken-shards-of-glass/&gt;.

This Swimming Pool Sits Comfortably In The Countryside Of Portugal

Mario Martins Atelier designed this swimming pool at a home in Portugal, where the design intention was described as “simple with a quiet presence, and where the natural vegetation, of almond and carob trees, typical of the Algarve countryside, predominates.”

Photography by Fernando Guerra FG + SG

“This Swimming Pool Sits Comfortably In The Countryside Of Portugal.” Accessed September 16, 2015. http://www.contemporist.com/2015/09/10/this-swimming-pool-sits-comfortably-in-the-countryside-of-portugal/.

Urban Reef – Underwater Sculpture by Jason DeCaires Taylor

urban-reef-006-jason-decaires-taylor-sculpture

Home is where the heart is…new series of works using suburban styled houses as artificial reefs with individual “rooms” for marine life.
“Urban Reef – Underwater Sculpture by Jason DeCaires Taylor.” Underwater Sculpture by Jason DeCaires Taylor. Web. 15 Sept. 2015. <http://www.underwatersculpture.com/sculptures/urban-reef/&gt;.

Casa Malaparte

Alternative names Villa Malaparte, Malaparte House
General information
Type Private house
Architectural style Modern architecture
Location Isle of Capri
Country Italy
Coordinates 40°32′49″N14°15′33″ECoordinates: 40°32′49″N 14°15′33″E
Current tenants Foundation Giorgio Ronchi [1]
Construction started 1937
Renovated 1980–90
Client Curzio Malaparte
Design and construction
Architect Adalberto Libera

Casa Malaparte (also Villa Malaparte) is a house on Punta Massullo, on the eastern side of the Isle of Capri, Italy. It is one of the best examples of Italian modern and contemporary architecture.

The house was conceived around 1937 by the well-known Italian architect Adalberto Libera for Curzio Malaparte. Malaparte actually rejected Libera’s design and built the home himself with the help of Adolfo Amitrano, a local stonemason.

Casa Malaparte is a red masonry box with reverse pyramidal stairs leading to the roof patio. On the roof is a freestanding curving white wall of increasing height. It sits on a dangerous cliff 32 metres above the sea overlooking the Gulf of Salerno. Access to this private property is either by foot from the Town of Capri or by boat and a staircase cut into the cliff. Casa Malaparte’s interior and exterior (particularly the rooftop patio) are prominently featured in Jean-Luc Godard’s 1963 film, Contempt (Le Mépris).

Casa Malaparte was abandoned and neglected after the death of Curzio Malaparte in 1957. It suffered from vandalism and natural elements for many years and was seriously damaged, including the desecration of a beautiful tiled stove, before the first serious renovation started in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The building was donated to the Foundation Giorgio Ronchi in 1972.

Malaparte’s great-nephew, Niccolò Rositani, is primarily responsible for restoring the house to a livable state. Much of the original furniture is still there, because it is too large to remove. The marble sunken tub in the bedroom of his mistress still exists and functions. His bedroom and book lined study are still intact. Many Italian industrialists have donated materials for the preservation.

Today the house is used for serious study and certain cultural events in Italy and is admired and hated by many architecture enthusiasts worldwide.

The house can only be reached by traversing the island. The last twenty minute walk is over private property, belonging to The Ronchi Foundation. It takes an hour and a half to walk there from Capri’s Piazzetta at the summit of the funiculare from the Marina Grande. The house can be reached by sea, on calm days only, as the waves are cast upon treacherous rocks and there has not been an official pier for many years. From the sea, one must climb 99 steps to reach the house. Malaparte gave his friend and boatman money to open a restaurant which is run by the boatman’s son today. It is the only restaurant one would pass on the path from the Piazzetta to the promontory where Tiberius built his palace, Villa Jovis.

The book Malaparte: Casa Come Me (A House Like Me) edited by Michael McDonough, includes drawings and essays by many prominent artists and architects, such as James Wines,Tom Wolfe, Robert Venturi, Emilio Ambasz, Ettore Sottsass, Michael Graves, Willem Dafoe, Peter Eisenman, Wiel Arets and many other luminaries of arts and letters. Casa Malaparte was also prominently featured in the Jean-Luc Godard film, Contempt (1963).

(n.d.). Retrieved July 13, 2015, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casa_Malaparte

Casa Brutale, lyrical brutalism

Casa Brutale is a geometrical translation of the landscape. It is an unclad statement on the simplicity and harmony of contemporary architecture. It is a chameleonic living space, created to serve its owner and respect the environment. It is the inverted reference to Casa Malaparte, encased and protected by the tender earth that has hosted the human civilization for millennia. It is a complete study of aesthetics, structure, function and engineering, which thoroughly detailed, awaits solely its realisation.

Casa Brutale is OPA’s challenging vision of innovative architecture, where innovation refers to long forgotten terms such as ambience and materiality. Its subtle form allows for the magnificent view and the game of light and shadow to take center stage. The residence is constructed with simple materials: wood, glass and concrete, the convergence of the surrounding earth and water. The landscape is integral to the underlying concept, since elements penetrate and prevail over the construction. The roof of Casa Brutale, a glazed bottom swimming pool, is a continuation of the poetic Aegean Sea and in perfect communication with the vast blue of the Greek sky.

In essential simplicity, Casa Brutale is defined by three thick concrete slabs with all the installations preformed. The crystalline pool, made by reinforced glass, is set between the walls to smoothen the hard materials and let the abundant natural light through, illuminating the residence. The enormous glass façade frames and extracts the beauty of the Aegean. And small details of black-coated steel and brown/red aged wood complete the composition.

In literal groundbreaking integration, Casa Brutale penetrates the landscape. The underground building benefits from a perfect homeostatic mechanism with thermal insulation from the surrounding ground, and the cooling properties of the swimming pool. The optical impact of the building on the landscape is minimal, with only one façade on the cliff side and no volume extruding from the ground level.

Light penetrates the transparent or semi-transparent surfaces of Casa Brutale, bringing it to life. The dynamic light patterns caress the bare concrete with refractions and shadows. Bare concrete, or beton brut, is the finishing technique that gave the name to both brutalism and Casa Brutale. Raw, unpretentious, monolithic, marked by the wooden planks used to mold the casting.

After descending 50 stairs to the Aegean, under the shadows of epic concrete beams, you reach the entrance (also accessible by elevator). The tall, rotating door of aged wood (with the axis at ¾ lengths) opens to a breathtaking sea view, through the glass façade. The remaining space is bare, pure and simple; minimalism at its best. A concrete cast dining table is combined with concrete benches, clad with warm wood. Smooth curves sculpture the fireplace on the wall next to the bench. Behind the dining table, the guest room is formed under an old-fashioned Zoellner slab with a glass corner. Next to the guest room, there is a small passage to the utility rooms (storage room, bathroom and WC).

An inner staircase consists of thin, steel steps that allow the optical continuity from the kitchen to the glass façade. The staircase leads you to the mezzanine floor, where the master bedroom is exposed to the same overpowering vision of the Aegean. The bed is cast of concrete with wood finishing, while the walls are covered with mirror to enhance the play between light and shadows.

Casa Brutale redefines the harmonious coexistence of human and nature in a poetic homage to pure Brutalism.

Casa Brutale, lyrical brutalism | OPA works. (n.d.). Retrieved July 13, 2015, from http://opaworks.com/portfolio/casa-brutale/

Modern Summer Home Assembling Panoramic Ocean Views

From the very first time you enter the Long Dune Residence, you know it will surprise you with a modern floor plan enhanced by carefully designed details. The architects warn that “little is revealed until entering the house through a tall glass door that emerges as one approaches the house“. Imagined by Hammer Architects, the modern summer home rises in a summer vacation community in Massachusetts, known as Truro.

Perched on a coastal bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, interiors absorb panoramas of natural surroundings from behind revealing floor-to-ceiling windows and doors. This permanent visual connection to the outdoors brings glimpses of the Atlantic Ocean deep inside and encourages owners to relax and enjoy their modern summer home.

Photos by Peter Vanderwarker reveal how the abundance of natural light filters through framed windows. Gleaming water views mirroring the atmosphere outside are captured like live transmissions from nature. Additional views of the Pamet River and a fresh water pond, together with tall trees complete the inspiring natural setting. Mirrored on the inside, this natural order appears mingled with the home’s sleek design lines.

According to the architects, “the entry side of the house appears very solid with its wood clad walls and narrow strip windows enclosing the bathrooms, outdoor showers, stair, and laundry room. Little is revealed until entering the house through a tall glass door that emerges as one approaches the house. Once inside, the living and dining rooms, which occupy the building’s center, open to the dramatic water views through a floor to ceiling glass wall that features large sliding doors connecting to a multi-level outdoor deck.”

The contemporary architecture is spiced up with a linear floor-plan “broken” by a screened porch where owners and their guests enjoy meals with a view. “One wing of the house provides the guest bedrooms, while the other wing, which is rotated forty-five degrees in plan, contains the master bedroom suite. A screened porch with a referential kite shaped roof occupies the intersection of the two geometries providing views in all directions.”

Embedding active and passive solar design, the modern summer home supports and encourages a healthy lifestyle. Once you know how to plan home activities for your summer guests, a modern summer home will make its way to your summer wish list.

Modern Summer Home Assembling Panoramic Ocean Views. (2015, March 20). Retrieved July 5, 2015, from http://freshome.com/2015/03/20/modern-summer-home-assembling-panoramic-ocean-views/

A Louvered Beach House on the Arabian Sea

Built on a coconut plantation outside of Mumbai, India, on the Arabian Sea, Studio Mumbai’s Palmyra House is a place of refuge, not only from the city but also from people (houseguests possibly included). The 3,000-square-foot setup is split into two wooden louvered structures, each constructed using local traditional methods and wood. One building contains the living room, study, and master bedroom; the other houses the kitchen, dining room, and guest bedrooms. And should the occupants be feeling convivial, there’s a long, thin pool, perfect for swims together while sharing the expansive views out to the sea.

Photography by Helene Binet via ArchDaily, unless otherwise noted.

Hanway, C. (2015, May 27). Architect Visit: A Louvered Beach House on the Arabian Sea: Remodelista. Retrieved June 3, 2015, from http://www.remodelista.com/posts/architect-visit-a-louvered-beach-house-on-the-arabian-sea-studio-mumbai-palmyra-house


Small-Space Living: 13 Radical Tiny Cottages

I spent the first 18 years of my life occupying Harry Potter–size quarters in an otherwise spacious house—and feeling as if I was the lucky one. And though I’ve since gained a bit more elbow room, I’ve been gratified to watch the tiny house movement mushroom in the past decade. (And yet frequently let down by the twee hippie-gnome lairs that await beyond so many downsized front doors.) More architects ought to join the downsizing crusade—but, fortunately, enough have that the seeds of first-rate minuscule design have been planted. Here are some standouts, many of them from Remodelista and Gardenista’s own greatest-hits archive.

N.B.: One man’s hut is another’s palace. We tend to be generous in our definition of tiny: Our selections here range in size but most are under 300 square feet.

Guralnick, M. (2015, May 20). Small-Space Living: 13 Radical Tiny Cottages. Retrieved May 21, 2015, from http://www.remodelista.com/posts/small-space-living-13-radical-tiny-cottages-designed-by-architects?utm_source=Remodelista/Gardenista Subscriber List&utm_campaign=d26f58a198-Remodelista Daily Mail Campaign&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_447a717cea-d26f58a1


A house on pillars in Hungary by Allhitecture

This contemporary summer house is located in Balatonakarattya, Balatonkenese, Hungary. It sits in a beautiful region surrounded by trees and vegetation and it offers views over Lake Balaton. It occupies an area of 122.0 square meters and it has an interesting design. The house was a project by Allhitecture and it was built in 2009.

The house is a summer retreat and it was built on pillars. It’s a detail designed to make it easily integrate into the surrounding environment and the pillars were inspired by the tree-trunks. They support the front volume just like the trunks support the tree’s crown. This particular region around the lake requires all buildings to respect the Building Regulation made in the middle of the 20th century. This means they have to have a traditional, pitched roof. However, this plot is situated on the border and the architects managed to get permission for a flat roof that better fits with the modern design of the house.

The whole design of the house was influenced by the pine trees from the site. The trees were also kept. The exterior of the house is modern and meant to make it integrate into the surroundings. The interior is on the same page. It follows the traditional interior design of summer houses in that region. The ground floor contains the communal areas and the private spaces, in this case the bedrooms, are on the first floor.{found on archdaily and pics by Tamas Bujnovszky}.  (Ganea)

Ganea, Simona. “A house on pillars in Hungary by Allhitecture.” Homedit. N.p., 21 Jul 2012. Web. Web. 21 Jul. 2012. <http://www.homedit.com/a-house-pillars-hungary-allhitecture/&gt;.


RMDM architects: 10 very high performance apartments – social housing, paris

image © cecile septet (all images courtesy of RMDM)

french firm RMDM architects have recently completed ’10 very high performance apartments’, a social housing building within the 18th arrondissement of paris, france. with the encompassing urban block undergoing transformation, this pair of structures offers a home to lower income residents while an outdoor area for repose creates a vegetated buffer zone between the building and densely developed district. an entry elevation clad with vertically sliding aluminum cassette panels in three tones of white to gray activate the facade projecting a structure which is entirely closed off from the surrounding environment or dynamically adjusts to the daily activity of dwellers. the hinges allow the shutters to be opened in diverse degrees, offering privacy and protection from solar gain.

a U-shaped plan wraps an open-air patio to benefit each of the units from natural daylight. living spaces are oriented to overlook the dynamic and communal spaces. two of the roof wings feature terraces while a row of inclined solar panels mirror the exterior’s aesthetic and support hot water production. (db)

db, lauren. “RMDM architects: 10 very high performance apartments – social housing, paris.” designboom. N.p., 16 Jul 2012. Web. 16 Jul. 2012. <http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/22427/rmdm-architects-social-housing-in-paris-10-very-high-performance-apartments.html&gt;.


The Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture

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The Caterpillar House is a strange but beautiful combination of styles and influences. It is essentially a modern reinterpretation of a ranch-style house. At the same time, the mid-century influence is very strong. The idea of combining all these elements is an odd one but, when you think about it, these styles might not have much in common but combined they result in a well-balanced and original composition.

The house only has one level. This makes it long and close to the ground. If we also take into consideration the choice of materials and the architectural elements, we can say that the Caterpillar House integrates naturally into the surroundings. It’s almost as if it were there from the beginning of time. Given the fact that this is a ranch-style house, the close indoor-outdoor connection should be a given. The house rises from the ground and grass and becomes a part of the landscape.

Internally, the Caterpillar house is open planned. This is only one of the features of modern design. It has wood-paneled ceilings throughout, a feature that also continues outside, creating a continuous design. The interior thus becomes cozy and warm but also casual and elegant. Most of the furniture is also made of wood and features a modern and simple design. Also, the house is sustainable and beautiful at the same time.  (Ganea)

Ganea, Simona. “The Caterpillar House by Feldman Architecture.” Homedit. N.p., 15 Jul 2012. Web. 16 Jul. 2012. <http://www.homedit.com/the-caterpillar-house-feldman-architecture/&gt;.

 


lacroze miguens prati: la compartida, house in tajamares

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  image © gustavo sosa

buenos aires-based practice lacroze miguens prati have completed ‘la compartida’ a residence positioned within a field in tajamares de la pedrera, rocha, uruguay. a minimal rectilinear volume stretches along a northeast to southwest axis. a low-profile roof spans the continuous interior, with a stepped profile to introduce natural daylight through a clerestory band. glass walls enclose a central living space, offering views to the meadow in either direction. the quaint size of the common areas is expanded by visual transparency to the rolling landscape.
the interior opens to a veranda which borders each side of the building, one containing a swimming pool which parallels the facade. the end wing contains the master bedroom while the opposing half of the home is subdivided to create two intimate spaces, large enough for individual sleeping quarters.   (db)

 

db, lauren. “lacroze miguens prati: la compartida, house in tajamares.” designboom. N.p., 04 Apr 2012. Web. 6 Apr. 2012. <http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/20315/lacroze-miguens-prati-la-compartida-house-in-tajamares.html&gt;.

 

 


The modern and adaptable Cabin GJ-9 in Norway

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This is Cabin GJ-9, a modern adaptation of the standard design. It’s situated in Bjergøy, Norway and it was a project by Gudmundur Jonsson Arkitektkontor. The cabin was designed as a space able to adapt to multiple settings. It was designed with no particular site or environment in mind. It’s also a product for mass-production distribution. The main idea behind this project was to come up with a new concept and a general idea for a cabin that would be able to integrate in a variety of places.

It was designed as a cozy cabin that would most likely be places somewhere where there are beautiful views. The cabin features two volumes. They contain the bedrooms and the service area. There’s also a living and dining space in a glazed pavilion in between these volumes. This area has connections to nature in all directions. The cabin has a large roof that accentuates its design and also provides protection for the terrace during rainy days.

The roof also tends to give the impression of a much larger space that it actually is. The Cabin is small but very well planned. The different areas are nicely separated and yet the whole design is brought together by the terrace and the roof. Since the cabin was designed as a modern space for those who like to spend time close to nature and admiring the views, it has lots of glass walls. And since the roof is very simple and also large, it offers the possibility of creating a roof terrace as well.   (Ganea)

 

Ganea, Simona. “The modern and adaptable Cabin GJ-9 in Norway.” Homedit. N.p., 19 Mar 2012. Web. 20 Mar. 2012. <http://www.homedit.com/the-modern-and-adaptable-cabin-gj-9-in-norway/&gt;.

 


Whistler Public Library / Whistler Village, Canada

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via HCMA

Acting as a bridge between the built-up fabric of Whistler Village and the adjacent community park, the library provides a bold civic facility and is both a showpiece of sustainable design and a contemporary response to its mountain resort context. Design features include innovative prefabricated wood roof panels, locally quarried basalt and a large gently sloping green roof. The new south facing entry plaza provides an important new civic space, while support spaces such as an end-of-trip shower and change facility for bicycle and cross country ski commuters ensured that this was the first LEED® Gold certified library in Canada.

Awards
Lieutenant Governor of BC Awards for Architecture
Wood Design Real Cedar Award
BC Wood Design Award

 (Hughes Condon Marler Architects)

Hughes Condon Marler Architects (HCMA), . (n.d.). Whistler public library. Retrieved from http://hcma.ca/whistler-public-library/?ref=15


Vertical Garden

via Remodelista

Outdoor walls become eye-catching gardens with our hanging wool pocket planters. Framed in a rustic wood, these unusual plant pockets make a striking statement and a convenient kitchen garden when planted with your favorite herbs or berries. These UV resistant 100% recycled fiber felt wall planters are made with reused plastic water bottles, making them a sustainable addition to your outdoor landscape.   (Remodelista)

Remodelista, . Long vertical garden [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://remodelista.com/products/long-vertical-garden


Old Stone Highway / East Hampton, New York

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Drawing its inspiration from a barn built in the 1800s, the Old Stone Highway house is concieved as a modern interpretation of the Long Island agricultural vernacular while also incorporating the use of environmentally low impact building technology.   (Berg Design Architects)

Berg Design Architects, . (n.d.). Old stone highway. Retrieved from http://www.bergdesignarchitects.com/index.php?/project/10


an image which only can be seen at a distance

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Assemblage Series

1999-2011

I started making assemblage artworks of this type in 1999. The artworks are made entirely out of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. I glue the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. I was interested in communicating through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. It is very important to me that I incorporate the actual objects into the art as opposed to a picture or rendition of it because it better expresses the intention of the artwork. I feel the junk is more powerful being present. It is an actual thing to be reckoned with that existed in this time and place and carries energy in and of itself.   (zac freeman art)

zac freeman art, . (n.d.). Assemblage series. Retrieved from http://www.zacfreemanart.com/artwork.html


a flexible meeting space in the forest

via Freshome - Interior Design, Decorating & Architecture Magazine

Outlandia has been shortlisted for The Architects’ Journal Small Projects 2011.

Outlandia is inspired by childhood dens, wildlife hides and bothies, by forest outlaws and Japanese poetry platforms. It is located in a copse of Norwegian Spruce and Larch on Forestry Commission land, at the foot of Ben Nevis in the Scottish Highlands, two miles from the town of Fort William. Outlandia is an artist-led project built to foster links between creativity and the environment.   (Outlandia, 2011)

 
Outlandia, . (2011, February 5). Small projects 2011 shortlist [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.outlandia.com/2011/02/small-projects-2011-shortlist.html

Seeds of Life Skyscraper

 

via eVolo

Honorable Mention
2011 Skyscraper Competition*

Mekano
Osama Mohamed Elghannam, Karim Mohamed Elnabawy, Mohamed Ahmed Khamis, Nesma Mohamed Abobakr
Egypt

The city of Cairo, in Egypt, has become one of the most polluted cities worldwide. The idea behind this proposal is to recycle the city’s waste and use it as building material for large-scale development that could eventually become a city in itself. 

The project is composed of an exoskeleton where different types of living and working units could be plugged-in. Each unit is designed with a specific program in mind – from small ones for single families to large ones for recreational areas such as parks and sports facilities. Hundreds of terraces are used for agriculture and rainwater collection, while specific sites are used to bury organic waste and produce biogas, electricity, and fertilizers.

 
* Established in 2006, the annual Skyscraper Competition recognizes outstanding ideas that redefine skyscraper design through the use of new technologies, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations, along with studies on globalization, flexibility, adaptability, and the digital revolution. This is also an investigation on the public and private space and the role of the individual and the collective in the creation of a dynamic and adaptive vertical community. The award seeks to discover young talent, whose ideas will change the way we understand architecture and its relationship with the natural and built environments. 
 
(ADMIN, 2011)
 
ADMIN, . (2011). Seeds of life skyscraper [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.evolo.us/competition/seeds-of-life-skyscraper/#more-8891

‘Lotus’

Black Line One X Architecture Studio

This concept approaches the entire site as a contributor to the landscape rather than  individual plots of land where single residences float randomly within an undesignated, un-specified space.    (Black Line One X Architecture Studio)

 

Black Line One X Architecture Studio, . (n.d.). lotus – entry awarded 3rd place in international design competition. Retrieved from http://bloxas.com.au/architects/?page_id=169


pure, natural and handmade.

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It’s all about the people and their crafts.   (Oliva & Marie Boutique)

Oliva & Marie Boutique, . (n.d.). Products. Retrieved from http://www.oliviamarieboutique.com/?utm_source=Remodelista+Daily+Subscriber+List&utm_campaign=a08e6d4a98-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email


a reconnection to nature…

A simple reminder to feel happy in your soul. (the slug and the squirrel)

the slug and the squirrel, . (n.d.). the slug and the squirrel. Retrieved from http://slugandsquirrel.com/about.html