minimal | clean lines | lack of ornamentation | contrast | revealed structure | innovative | undisguised materials | functional | playful | open floor plan | contemporary l |iving with nature | organic | non-traditional | pure form | timeless

concrete

This Swimming Pool Sits Comfortably In The Countryside Of Portugal

Mario Martins Atelier designed this swimming pool at a home in Portugal, where the design intention was described as “simple with a quiet presence, and where the natural vegetation, of almond and carob trees, typical of the Algarve countryside, predominates.”

Photography by Fernando Guerra FG + SG

“This Swimming Pool Sits Comfortably In The Countryside Of Portugal.” Accessed September 16, 2015. http://www.contemporist.com/2015/09/10/this-swimming-pool-sits-comfortably-in-the-countryside-of-portugal/.

Urban Reef – Underwater Sculpture by Jason DeCaires Taylor

urban-reef-006-jason-decaires-taylor-sculpture

Home is where the heart is…new series of works using suburban styled houses as artificial reefs with individual “rooms” for marine life.
“Urban Reef – Underwater Sculpture by Jason DeCaires Taylor.” Underwater Sculpture by Jason DeCaires Taylor. Web. 15 Sept. 2015. <http://www.underwatersculpture.com/sculptures/urban-reef/&gt;.

Casa Brutale, lyrical brutalism

Casa Brutale is a geometrical translation of the landscape. It is an unclad statement on the simplicity and harmony of contemporary architecture. It is a chameleonic living space, created to serve its owner and respect the environment. It is the inverted reference to Casa Malaparte, encased and protected by the tender earth that has hosted the human civilization for millennia. It is a complete study of aesthetics, structure, function and engineering, which thoroughly detailed, awaits solely its realisation.

Casa Brutale is OPA’s challenging vision of innovative architecture, where innovation refers to long forgotten terms such as ambience and materiality. Its subtle form allows for the magnificent view and the game of light and shadow to take center stage. The residence is constructed with simple materials: wood, glass and concrete, the convergence of the surrounding earth and water. The landscape is integral to the underlying concept, since elements penetrate and prevail over the construction. The roof of Casa Brutale, a glazed bottom swimming pool, is a continuation of the poetic Aegean Sea and in perfect communication with the vast blue of the Greek sky.

In essential simplicity, Casa Brutale is defined by three thick concrete slabs with all the installations preformed. The crystalline pool, made by reinforced glass, is set between the walls to smoothen the hard materials and let the abundant natural light through, illuminating the residence. The enormous glass façade frames and extracts the beauty of the Aegean. And small details of black-coated steel and brown/red aged wood complete the composition.

In literal groundbreaking integration, Casa Brutale penetrates the landscape. The underground building benefits from a perfect homeostatic mechanism with thermal insulation from the surrounding ground, and the cooling properties of the swimming pool. The optical impact of the building on the landscape is minimal, with only one façade on the cliff side and no volume extruding from the ground level.

Light penetrates the transparent or semi-transparent surfaces of Casa Brutale, bringing it to life. The dynamic light patterns caress the bare concrete with refractions and shadows. Bare concrete, or beton brut, is the finishing technique that gave the name to both brutalism and Casa Brutale. Raw, unpretentious, monolithic, marked by the wooden planks used to mold the casting.

After descending 50 stairs to the Aegean, under the shadows of epic concrete beams, you reach the entrance (also accessible by elevator). The tall, rotating door of aged wood (with the axis at ¾ lengths) opens to a breathtaking sea view, through the glass façade. The remaining space is bare, pure and simple; minimalism at its best. A concrete cast dining table is combined with concrete benches, clad with warm wood. Smooth curves sculpture the fireplace on the wall next to the bench. Behind the dining table, the guest room is formed under an old-fashioned Zoellner slab with a glass corner. Next to the guest room, there is a small passage to the utility rooms (storage room, bathroom and WC).

An inner staircase consists of thin, steel steps that allow the optical continuity from the kitchen to the glass façade. The staircase leads you to the mezzanine floor, where the master bedroom is exposed to the same overpowering vision of the Aegean. The bed is cast of concrete with wood finishing, while the walls are covered with mirror to enhance the play between light and shadows.

Casa Brutale redefines the harmonious coexistence of human and nature in a poetic homage to pure Brutalism.

Casa Brutale, lyrical brutalism | OPA works. (n.d.). Retrieved July 13, 2015, from http://opaworks.com/portfolio/casa-brutale/

A Modern Loft with Character

Loft apartments always have a distinct feel. Their openness, combined with their usual amounts of streaming light, makes them instantly appealing for most urban dwellers. Who wouldn’t want more light and a sense of more space in what’s usually a more crowded area? But lofts can also feel a bit cookie cutter, especially when the original space has been mass-converted to support loft living. A dozen or more lofts with the same feel and layout can feel stifling. This loft, designed by Indot, takes the idea of a traditional loft and plays with it using geometry, color, and texture. Don’t think that lofts are just limited to red exposed brick and neutrally painted walls.

A Modern Loft with Character. (n.d.). Retrieved July 12, 2015, from http://www.home-designing.com/2015/07/a-modern-loft-with-character?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: home-designing (Home Design Ideas)

Family Home in Vietnam With Lovely Pockets of Greenery: BQ-17 Residence

23o5Studio completed the design of BQ-17 Residence, a contemporary home located in an uncrowded neighborhood of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The design was adapted to the living needs of a couple and their three children, while taking in consideration the laws of urban planning. Local legislation required to leave 2.5m (8ft) front and 2m (6.6ft) behind the house, which somewhat challenged the initial plan of developing the construction more horizontally. According to the project developers, the solution was to “build interleaving spaces, which have different foolproof, placed around a central vertical space”, thus creating voids and connections between rooms.

Minimalism is the key feature of this residence; yet, quite a few elements stand out: “Seen from outside, the house has simple lines, yet strong enough to combine cubes as a sculpture. Lot of squares, with different sizes and free layout, joined with graceful greenery to attract people and make them curious about entering inside. The squares become highlighted from the front door to the central block. They do not only get natural light for the house, but also create an aesthetic effect at night.” By employing wood extensively for the furniture elements, doors, floors and central staircase, the designers achieved a welcoming family atmosphere-have a look! [Photography by Quang Tran]

Family Home in Vietnam With Lovely Pockets of Greenery: BQ-17 Residence. (2015, June 23). Retrieved June 24, 2015, from http://freshome.com/family-home-in-vietnam-with-lovely-pockets-of-greenery-bq-17-residence/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: FreshInspirationForYourHome (Freshome.com)

A Louvered Beach House on the Arabian Sea

Built on a coconut plantation outside of Mumbai, India, on the Arabian Sea, Studio Mumbai’s Palmyra House is a place of refuge, not only from the city but also from people (houseguests possibly included). The 3,000-square-foot setup is split into two wooden louvered structures, each constructed using local traditional methods and wood. One building contains the living room, study, and master bedroom; the other houses the kitchen, dining room, and guest bedrooms. And should the occupants be feeling convivial, there’s a long, thin pool, perfect for swims together while sharing the expansive views out to the sea.

Photography by Helene Binet via ArchDaily, unless otherwise noted.

Hanway, C. (2015, May 27). Architect Visit: A Louvered Beach House on the Arabian Sea: Remodelista. Retrieved June 3, 2015, from http://www.remodelista.com/posts/architect-visit-a-louvered-beach-house-on-the-arabian-sea-studio-mumbai-palmyra-house


Small-Space Living: 13 Radical Tiny Cottages

I spent the first 18 years of my life occupying Harry Potter–size quarters in an otherwise spacious house—and feeling as if I was the lucky one. And though I’ve since gained a bit more elbow room, I’ve been gratified to watch the tiny house movement mushroom in the past decade. (And yet frequently let down by the twee hippie-gnome lairs that await beyond so many downsized front doors.) More architects ought to join the downsizing crusade—but, fortunately, enough have that the seeds of first-rate minuscule design have been planted. Here are some standouts, many of them from Remodelista and Gardenista’s own greatest-hits archive.

N.B.: One man’s hut is another’s palace. We tend to be generous in our definition of tiny: Our selections here range in size but most are under 300 square feet.

Guralnick, M. (2015, May 20). Small-Space Living: 13 Radical Tiny Cottages. Retrieved May 21, 2015, from http://www.remodelista.com/posts/small-space-living-13-radical-tiny-cottages-designed-by-architects?utm_source=Remodelista/Gardenista Subscriber List&utm_campaign=d26f58a198-Remodelista Daily Mail Campaign&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_447a717cea-d26f58a1


GP House by Bitar Arquitectos

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Photographs: Leonardo Walther

Bitar Arquitectos have designed the GP House in Hidalgo, Mexico.

 

“GP House by Bitar Arquitectos.” CONTEMPORIST. N.p., 26 Mar 2013. Web. Web. 27 Mar. 2013. <http://www.contemporist.com/2013/03/26/gp-house-by-bitar-arquitectos/&gt;.

 

 


Replacing a Burned Down House Surrounded By Experimental Vegetation: GK House

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Located in the historic district of North Carolina’s Chapel Hill town, the GK House sits on a 1.5 acre site sloping from east to west. Accessible via an easement through an adjoining property, this imposing structure gathers wood, stone and glass in a contemporary display of architecture. Originally part of the Coker Estate, where amateur botanist Dr Coker composed a distinctive collection of plants derived from his experiments, the house sits surrounded by woods and greenery that offer an original outdoor experience. Constructed after the sketches of Raleigh- based Kenneth Hobgood Architects, the residential structure replaces the original house that burned down to the ground and took part of the vegetation down with it. Collaborating with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburg, architects managed to revive the grounds and compose a bright, cheery and stylish set of interior and exterior spaces, as you can see in the photos.  (Teicu)

Teicu, Ada. “Replacing a Burned Down House Surrounded By Experimental Vegetation: GK House.” Freshome Design & Architecture. N.p., 12 Aug. 2012. Web. Web. 12 Aug. 2012.


Aradas House by RVDM Architects

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RVDM Architects have designed the Aradas House in Aveiro, Portugal.

 

“Aradas House by RVDM Architects.” Contemporist. N.p., 23 July 2012. Web. Web. 23 Jul. 2012. <http://www.contemporist.com/2012/07/23/aradas-house-by-rvdm-architects/&gt;.


Villa Fabrica: Serenity in Santorini

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A factory transformed: architect Yannis Kaklamanis overhauled the interiors of a former wine and tsipouro (brandy) production facility, creating a sleek and minimal loft–style vacation retreat on the island of Santorini.

The compound consists of four separate residences, joined by communal outdoors spaces; Kaklamanis has restored the interiors using traditional materials like polished cement combined with sleek stainless kitchens and modern baths. The villas are available for rent; for information, go to Villa Fabrica.   (Julie)

“Villa Fabrica: Serenity in Santorini by Julie.” Remodelista. N.p., 20 July 2012. Web. Web. 21 Jul. 2012. <http://remodelista.com/posts/villa-fabrica-serenity-in-santorini?utm_source=Remodelista Daily Subscriber List&utm_campaign=8290c44c31-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email>.

 


A house on pillars in Hungary by Allhitecture

This contemporary summer house is located in Balatonakarattya, Balatonkenese, Hungary. It sits in a beautiful region surrounded by trees and vegetation and it offers views over Lake Balaton. It occupies an area of 122.0 square meters and it has an interesting design. The house was a project by Allhitecture and it was built in 2009.

The house is a summer retreat and it was built on pillars. It’s a detail designed to make it easily integrate into the surrounding environment and the pillars were inspired by the tree-trunks. They support the front volume just like the trunks support the tree’s crown. This particular region around the lake requires all buildings to respect the Building Regulation made in the middle of the 20th century. This means they have to have a traditional, pitched roof. However, this plot is situated on the border and the architects managed to get permission for a flat roof that better fits with the modern design of the house.

The whole design of the house was influenced by the pine trees from the site. The trees were also kept. The exterior of the house is modern and meant to make it integrate into the surroundings. The interior is on the same page. It follows the traditional interior design of summer houses in that region. The ground floor contains the communal areas and the private spaces, in this case the bedrooms, are on the first floor.{found on archdaily and pics by Tamas Bujnovszky}.  (Ganea)

Ganea, Simona. “A house on pillars in Hungary by Allhitecture.” Homedit. N.p., 21 Jul 2012. Web. Web. 21 Jul. 2012. <http://www.homedit.com/a-house-pillars-hungary-allhitecture/&gt;.


Transition of a Fortified Italian Farmhouse

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Once upon a time, Arrighi was a watchtower peering over Tuscany and all along the Niccone Valley, with an adjoining fortified farmhouse. In recent years, the dwelling known as Castello di Reschio, in Umbria, Italy, is the result of a meticulous restoration that resulted in a luxurious L-shaped main house, and a standalone guest cottage.

Once the fortified farmhouse and watchtower, the impressive five bedroom main house is approached via a large paved courtyard beyond the entrance gates, past the sweet guest cottage that contains a double bedroom, en-suite bathroom, library and fully-fledged kitchen.

A glass encased external staircase tower is flooded with sunlight, and soaks in the extensive view over the very private and unspoiled 2,700 acre Reschio Estate, filled with rolling hills, vineyards, olive groves, chestnut and oak trees, extensive infinity pool and pool house.  (HOUSE TOURS)

HOUSE TOURS, . “Transition of a Fortified Italian Farmhouse.” home Designing. N.p., 18 Jul 2012. Web. 18 Jul. 2012. <http://www.home-designing.com/2012/07/transition-of-a-fortified-italian-farmhouse?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: home-designing (Home Design Ideas)&utm_content=Yahoo! Mail>.


‘house in las arenas’

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  all images courtesy of artadi arquitectos

 

lima-based artadi arquitectos have finished the ‘house in las arenas’, a private beach-side residence 100 miles south of lima, peru.  the conceptual diagram consists of a hollowed rectangular box lifted off the ground and oriented towards the sea, bisected by a diagonal interior partition. strategic voids have been added to the outer planes to mediate the amount of light entering the residence andnd funnel views towards the sky and sea. the clean geometric design also offers a simplicity in material and tone, with white surfaces dominating the external components. internal sand-beige hues, the wooden walkways and darker granite tiles lining the foundation and furniture pieces subtly contrast the bright shell.

programmatically, the master bedroom and kitchen find themselves as central elements in the residence, visually connected to the semi-outdoor living area/pool/terrace space. the rest of the service functions can be found concentrically around the main volume, with two smaller sleeping quarters within a semi-basement level. circulation is in the open air, existing in the patio and entrance vestibule, as well as the periphery of the house itself. the regional climate allows the user to inhabit with the dwelling primarily as an external experience.   (db)

 

db, danny. “artadi arquitectos: house in las arenas.” designboom. N.p., 12 07 2012. Web. 14 Jul. 2012. <http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/22307/artadi-arquitectos-house-in-las-arenas.html&gt;.

 


lacroze miguens prati: la compartida, house in tajamares

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  image © gustavo sosa

buenos aires-based practice lacroze miguens prati have completed ‘la compartida’ a residence positioned within a field in tajamares de la pedrera, rocha, uruguay. a minimal rectilinear volume stretches along a northeast to southwest axis. a low-profile roof spans the continuous interior, with a stepped profile to introduce natural daylight through a clerestory band. glass walls enclose a central living space, offering views to the meadow in either direction. the quaint size of the common areas is expanded by visual transparency to the rolling landscape.
the interior opens to a veranda which borders each side of the building, one containing a swimming pool which parallels the facade. the end wing contains the master bedroom while the opposing half of the home is subdivided to create two intimate spaces, large enough for individual sleeping quarters.   (db)

 

db, lauren. “lacroze miguens prati: la compartida, house in tajamares.” designboom. N.p., 04 Apr 2012. Web. 6 Apr. 2012. <http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/9/view/20315/lacroze-miguens-prati-la-compartida-house-in-tajamares.html&gt;.

 

 


Simple Three-story Modern Rectangular House Design

Three-story residence with simple modern rectangular design style. Although has simple exterior and look rigid, this modern rectangular house has completely different style between frontage and rear side. The frontage exterior and half-parts of this modern rectangular house is closed. The frontage coated with glazed aluminum panels. Certain of panels can be automatically open to reveal the windows.

The rear part of this modern rectangular house is completely open. The transparent look achieved by installing the glass sheets walls from rear house until half-part volume of side of house (vertically and horizontally from first until third floor), and of course full-glass sliding doors. The transparent volume overlooks the waterfront and panoramic view beyond.

Inside, more surprising interior design achieved. Most of each zone has double-height ceiling and the interior spaces meandering around center “inner-tower”. The “inner-tower” clad with wood and contains toilets of each floor and as storage, and a dumbwaiter. Beside of three bedrooms, lounge, utility area, and two studies area, this house has an open roof terrace built at third floor. The simple roof terrace directs connect with main bathroom. The furniture and other interior elements details specially created for this modern rectangular house. This modern house design also has sustainable house features, like cold and heat pump, thermal energy storage and solar collectors.  Designed by Heeswijk.(archinspire)

 

archinspire, . Simple Three-story Modern Rectangular House Design. Home Design Ideas, 29 Mar 2012. Web. 30 Mar. 2012. <http://archinspire.com/home-design/simple-three-story-modern-rectangular-house-design.htm&gt;.

 


Fragmented House / AQSO Arquitectos

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Architects: AQSO Arquitectos – PE. Pinés & Jové
Location: Laguna de Duero, Valladolid, Spain
Ground Floor Area: 200 sqm
Completion: 2012
Photographs: AQSO Arquitectos

‘Arquitectos Office’ (AQSO) has recently completed the construction of the ‘Fragmented house’. The concept solution for this residence starts from a compact block transforming, after several divisions and shifts, into an external broken-down form, result of the arrangement of the interior spaces.

The house is located near Laguna de Duero, a town situated in the municipality of ‘Tierra de Pinares’, in Valladolid. The building is orientated facing west and distributed in two levels: living room and day use spaces in the ground floor and master bedroom upstairs. The form is conceived as a series of juxtaposed elements defining the different atmospheres and spaces.

Therefore, the entrance is demarcated by two parallel blocks and another recessed one working as main access. The front part of the house, facing the garden, is marked out by the cantilevered block where the bedroom at the upper level is located, in contrast with the one of the ground floor. The rear of the house, where the garage can be found, is made up of several stair-shaped elements.

Inside, the living and dining rooms are linked into an open and continuous space just partially blocked by a stone masonry wall and the freestanding staircase giving access to the upper floor. From the master bedroom, provided with a generous walk-in wardrobe and ensuite Jacuzzi, it is possible to access the roof, partially used as terrace with a small solarium.

The façade is made by big scale matte ceramic pieces combined with stone masonry walls, inside there is a predominance of light colors in walls, floor, doors and windows. In the front garden of the house there is a slender swimming pool with spa and an independent block facing the yard with a wide bay window to be opened and converted into a summer house.

King , Victoria . “Fragmented House / AQSO Arquitectos” 15 Mar 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 19 Mar 2012. <http://www.archdaily.com/216755&gt;

 


Haifa House by Pitsou Kedem Architects

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A private residence built in the center of a historic avenue and at the very heart of Haifa’s French Carmel neighborhood.

The avenue is studded with a number of residences designed in the Bauhaus style. The Bauhaus style gained its hold in Israel in the wake of international styling trends and is a ornament free design style, both simple and down to earth. The style celebrated the aesthetics of the machine and was characterized by uniformity of color and by unassuming and simple finishes and facades. The style faithfully represented the spirit of the age and the location. This project, designed decades later, creates a line that connects contemporary styling with the spirit of that bygone era.

The project emphasizes and sharpens the differences between apparently similar design styles of contemporary minimalism influenced by Japan and the austere moderation of the modernism that characterized the end of the 1950?s. Both of these paradigms translate into a way of life, to the Israeli environment and climate. The sophistication and the minimalism that existed at the heyday of the Bauhaus period have been translated, in this latest reincarnation, into a spacial purity and prestigious restraint.

In his design, the architect has expressed his own, localized interpretation for free planning in which there is a spacial continuity achieved through light, appearance and movement and the placement of secondary spaces around one, large and open central space. The architect has succeeded in creating the experience of continuous, intimate and defined spaces with different levels of symbiotic, mutual interaction with the central space and yet without detracting from the overall understanding of the structure. Despite the intensification of the residences central space which finds expression in a double sized open space reaching the entire height of the building with one completely transparent façade facing the direction of the courtyard, through the use of controlled and restrained formality and the use of materials with no external facings, the designer has succeeded in showing his belief that it is possible to create a residential space of quality and timelessness.

In an attempt to connect with the historic avenue and the houses that have inhabited it since the 1950?s, the architect has paid great attention to homes front facing façade. The front of the building is almost anonymous, for the most part, a closed element, free of unnecessary ornamentation and one that combines a monochromatic color scheme based on the grays and whites that characterized that same era. Only the floating upper roof hints at a harmony with contemporary design. There is a sense of acceptance of the avenues importance and an attempt to assimilate into its, fragile and gentle structure and in no way try to force contemporary architecture on the surrounding environment. Only the floating mass of the roof hints that, despite the desire to be part of the avenues context and the spirit of that historical period, it is clear to the observer that here we have a bold attempt to create an architectural language that leaves a clear signature and the fingerprint of the designer.

The home was, as said, designed around a wide, high public space that constitutes the connecting point and provides a view of all of the homes different wings as well as to the central courtyard and the pool. In order to further strengthen the impact of the central space it has been coated with exposed concrete panels and a large library on the wall as a central motif. A large, ribbon window allows light to enter deep into the space, creating movement and dynamism on the central wall. The architect has covered all of the structures spaces with an expansive roof which appears to be suspended, weightless in the air and floating effortlessly with no apparent means of support. The roof frames and consolidates the various parts of the structure with the apparent dissociation between the roof and the building creating an impressive, formal dialogue.

Movement within the house is accompanied by different views of the outside environment; exposed and open areas and other areas that are framed and focused on a specific view that was designed specifically for that area. The underlying concept of the homes design is one of quiet and formal restraint; the home is a place of tranquility and calm where the minimalistic details, the clean language and the meaning, separate the residents from the world outside. The architecture and the interior design combine a climatic relationship with light and air, an expression of the homes functionality and the uniform design lines both internal and external.

The materials and the colors used for both the interior and the exterior range from white to gray combined with wooden strips. The simple, clean shapes and the light play a central role in the interior design. Shade and light create ever changing performances of shapes and movement, “playing” on the walls, the ceilings and the floors of the building throughout the day. The combination of the geometric light shows against the horizontal and vertical surfaces, made from many different materials, creates a unique atmosphere in the internal spaces and the house’s exterior that make a powerful statement of uniformity and calmness. During the day, natural light entering the residence and its movement creates absorbing light shows. At night, when darkness falls, artificial light, and especially the light seeping out from the pool, create within the structures spaces a totally different atmosphere, one that is almost mystical and magical.

The design of the courtyard is characterized by the same restraint of form with the choice of trees and their placement also communicates with the avenue and the surrounding environment. And so, despite the fact that different worlds and different eras exist in the space between the historical Bauhaus of the avenue and that of this modern and minimalistic home, there still exists a relationship between them, a feeling that one is not strange to the other.

“Haifa House by Pitsou Kedem Architects.” Contemporist. N.p., 22 Nov 2011. Web. 24 Nov. 2011. http://www.contemporist.com/2011/11/22/haifa-house-by-pitsou-kedem-architects/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: contemporist (CONTEMPORIST).

 


Split-level Modern House Design

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Modern house design built on urban lot with dimensions of 6 x 24 m. This modern house designed in open-plan, a transparent style, lighted and ventilated at the front and back. The house exterior structure is cubic-like, full of large glazing windows and structured by steel reinforced concrete cast and slabs in prefabricated concrete. The interesting design idea of this modern house design is the interior design layout that has split-level. Split-level interior structure developed to organize 150m2 volume because it’s sloping terrain and spacious interior needed. The interior distributed in over half levels and create a three story zone of building volume with beautiful unclear floor interior division. Both exterior and interior has wooden and iron elementals, combine with rawness of concrete this modern house is simple and economical but looks beautiful. First floor split-level spaces are containing kitchen-dining room and half-level is for living room and entrance area, while all infrastructures including water tank, heating and sewage treatment system placed in lowest level of the ground. Nest to kitchen-dining is simple modern outdoor garden. Second floor level for space between area and bedroom&bathroom. Third floor level area contains workspace office with compact library and master bedroom suite (including bathroom), and the half level is outdoor terrace to capture the city landscape beyond.

Year: 2008.

Area: 150 m².

Architects: Apiacás Architects.

Structural design: Mr. Mesquita Maria de Lourdes.

Hydraulic and electrical design: Ramoska Castellani and Designers Associates Ltd..

Illumination design:Ricardo Heder – reka lighting.

Photos:Pregnolato Kusuki & Photographic Studio.

archinspire, . “Modern House Design Split-level Beautiful Unclear Floor Interior Division.” Home Design Ideas | Decorating | Gardening. Web. 15 Nov 2011. <http://archinspire.com/home-design/modern-timber-house-renovation-beautiful-landscape-site.htm&gt;.


living spaces with the outdoors while maintaining privacy…

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Description from the architect:

Modest houses on small lots comprise the Quillen’s Point neighborhood, adjacent to the Chesapeake Bay in Ocean View, Delaware.  An eclectic mix of houses, gravel roads ending at the bay and wooded lots provide a nostalgic, informal setting for this new house.  The project site is near the end of Burbage Lane, the second lot from the bay with expectations that the adjacent waterfront lot will eventually be developed.

In an effort to integrate living spaces with the outdoors while maintaining privacy from Burbage Lane and neighboring houses, the scheme is organized around a centrally located garden.  With sixteen foot high ceilings, the eastern volume contains the public living spaces. Continuous clerestory windows assist in providing an abundance of natural light into the space, allowing views to the treetops and sky while minimizing the close proximity of the adjacent houses.  A twenty foot wide glass wall slides into a pocket, enhancing the relationship to the outdoors, and provides a sense of living in a garden.  The two story western volume is comprised of bedrooms and a small second floor living space.  A one story glass link connects the volumes and visually opens to the central garden.

The house was conceived as two simple, flat-roofed volumes, varying in height, intersecting and overlapping a one story circulation space which connects the volumes.  The east volume is constructed with cement board, the west volume with corrugated siding and the one story connecting space with the ground face concrete block.   The exterior material palette is quiet and subdued. Materials are selected for their expected long term durability, ease of installation and initial cost. The impact of the one story horizontal volume facing the street is intended to reflect the scale of neighboring structures while the narrow two story volumes are oriented perpendicular to the street reducing their apparent scale.

This house is designed in strong counterpoint to many of the houses built in the last era of abundant resources, expensive materials, and limitless floor area. The house is not large; it comprises three bedrooms and 2400 square feet.  The house is constructed with modest materials that include concrete floors throughout the first floor, oak flooring on the second floor and plastic laminate and oak millwork.

The house was designed to achieve a balance between recognition of the picturesque Chesapeake Bay landscape and a more intimate, secluded garden environment. Expansive openings to the private garden combined with smaller, selectively oriented openings toward the greater landscape allow for a sense of privacy while maintaining a sensibility of direct connection to the rhythms of nature.

Dave. (2011, November 12). Lujan house by robert m. gurney [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.contemporist.com/2011/11/12/lujan-house-by-robert-m-gurney/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: contemporist (CONTEMPORIST)


Ravine Residence / Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Spring 2006
11,600 sf
Siamak Hariri, Partner-in-Charge

This residence employs two volumes with carefully choreographed openings that address the public street while maintaining the importance of domestic intimacy and privacy. The back of the house takes advantage of its ravine setting with a design of transparency that maximizes the natural light and provides natural landscape vistas. Employing a vocabulary of enduring materials of French limestone, roughcast stucco, and teak windows, the house underscores the client’s desire to create a generational home.

2010 Tucker Design Award, Building Stone Institute Award of Excellence

(Hariri Pontarini Architects)
 
Hariri Pontarini Architects, . (n.d.). Ravine residence. Retrieved from http://www.hariripontarini.com/projects/private/ravine-residence

“What are this things?”

ENTRAPMENT / Mark Dorf Photography

Creation can be considered one of the most powerful abilities a human possesses, whether it be through the hand of an artist, the architect or businessman, an inherent amount of power and control is given to the creator. However, this amount of control and power can grow to become intoxicating leading to devastating adverse and unseen side effects. However apparent these effects are, they are not always understood and can be ignored and seen as neutral to those who encounter them until it is too late and the potential damage has been done.   (Dorf)

Dorf, M. (n.d.). Environmental occupations. Retrieved from http://www.dorfphoto.net/env_occ.html


Atherton Residence / California

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Located on the peninsula south of San Francisco, this house sits on an internal suburban flag lot. The previous 1950s house, removed due to structural problems, featured mature landscaping and a manmade pond that the clients wanted to preserve. They wanted their new house to be a private retreat that maximizes the drama of the pond and takes advantage of the privacy of the site. The design solution breaks the program into four buildings – main house, study, pool house and garage – that ring the edge of the site and focus inward on the pond, garden and pool. Large sliding glass doors open directly out to the pond and terrace. The roofs conceal photovoltaic and solar hot water panels. The house is heated with a radiant system in the stone floors, and despite the hot climate it is not air conditioned, but passively cooled with a combination of overhangs, shades, and operable windows. The house also features many green building materials, including high fly-ash concrete, formaldehyde-free casework and denim insulation. The new house creates a special place for the clients, making a main residence feel like a vacation retreat.   (Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects )

Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects , . (n.d.). Atherton residence california. Retrieved from http://www.tgharchitects.com/projects/houses/atherton/


478 St. Paul / Denver, Colorado

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The Residence strives to set new standards in contemporary design in Cherry Creek.  Located at 5th and St. Paul streets, the home anchors the corner in this distinctive Denver neighborhood.  Drawing from the principles of mid-century modern architecture, the interior embraces the exterior and floods sunlight throughout the two-story space.  The elegance of form is enriched by the use of textural, natural materials.  Walls of Colorado rose sandstone, smooth sandstone veneer and polished concrete block interlock with stainless steel and glass to create a truly unique, yet comfortable urban living environment.  Patrick Beaton designed the Residence while the design principal/co-owner at Site 7  Solutions.   (Beaton DESIGN, LLC)

Beaton DESIGN, LLC, Initials. (n.d.). 478 st. paul. Retrieved from http://www.beatondesign.com/