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What Is Mid-Century Modern, and Why Do We Love It So Much?

We all know that styles are cyclical and, of course, the world of interior design is not exempt. The best aesthetics will be popular again and again. Right now, mid-century-modern design is making a comeback and, if you ask us, it’s for good reason.

What is it about this aesthetic that keeps us coming back for more over half a century later? We’ll tell you why mid-century modern will never really leave us — and how to work the style into your interiors while making sure they are rooted in the new millennium. After all, sometimes the old way of doing things really is the right way.

What Is Mid-Century Modern?

If you’ve ever seen an episode of Mad Men, you’re already familiar with mid-century-modern design. In fact, the term was coined in 1984 by author Cara Greenberg. She used it to discuss the signature looks of the 1960s in her book Mid-Century Modern: Furniture of the 1950s.

Though the moniker has become a bit broad in the past few decades, it’s most commonly used to refer to the styles that became popular in a post-World War II landscape. While there may be a few variations, most people agree that this time period extends from 1945-1969.

Interestingly, this style doesn’t just refer to aspects of interior design. It is commonly used as a descriptor for any architecture, furniture,  accessories, materials and technologies that grew in popularity after the end of the war.

It Showcases Simplicity

When you look at design projects that follow a mid-century-modern style, the one thing you won’t see is tons of excess. Rather than requiring a bunch of ornate embellishments, the mid-century look is all about stripping items down to their barest elements and letting their function become the star.

Keep this in mind when it comes to choosing the items that will fill your space. Look for furniture that has clean lines and, if needed, multiple uses. Stick to décor items that are modern or geometric in their aesthetic.

This concept should also be taken into account when it comes to designing the layout of your space. Rather than cluttering up the room, focus on choosing one strong focal area that will dictate the room’s function. For example, consider using a statement table in your dining room or creating an inviting seating area in your living room. Then, don’t be afraid to step back and allow negative space to play a key role in your design.

It Lets Us Play With Color

Of course, when you focus on bringing simplistic shapes into your space, it becomes necessary to add a layer of visual interest elsewhere. The mid-century-modern look does that by incorporating bold pops of color. Brooke Schneider, a designer based in Long Beach, Calif., explains it best:

“When homeowners think ‘color,’ they often think of the bright hues of the mid-century time period. With clear, cheerful colors, the 1950s exhibited a new American outlook of optimism that was comfortably removed from the drab war years.”

Don’t be afraid to go big with shades like blueberry, citron or fire-engine red. Just be sure to avoid mixing multiple loud colors like they did in that time period. Doing so might make your space look more outdated than retro-inspired. Instead, focus on tempering one colorful statement piece with more neutral hues to ensure a modern twist on this style of design.

It Connects Us With Nature

Since mid-century-modern design is all about simplicity, it makes sense that this school of style would harbor a strong connection to nature. In particular, those who are looking for ways to embrace sustainable design may be interested in what this aesthetic has to offer.

First, it’s important to consider how nature can affect the layout of the space. In mid-century architecture, large windows often play a key role. But anyone can work off those principles by making windows the focal point of your space whenever possible and making sure that they stay unencumbered from heavy drapery.

As for the design elements to fill your space, focus on choosing items made from natural materials such as wood, metal and leather or cotton textiles. Don’t be afraid to bring the outside in by adding greenery to accent your design.

There’s a reason why mid-century-modern design is present in our consciousness after over a half-century since its debut. Whether it’s the clean lines, bold colors or connection to nature, this school of style is currently making a big comeback in interior design.

“What Is Mid-Century Modern? – Freshome.” Freshomecom What Is MidCentury Modern and Why Do We Love It So Much Comments. 8 Oct. 2015. Web. 8 Oct. 2015. <http://freshome.com/mid-century-modern/&gt;.

This Swimming Pool Sits Comfortably In The Countryside Of Portugal

Mario Martins Atelier designed this swimming pool at a home in Portugal, where the design intention was described as “simple with a quiet presence, and where the natural vegetation, of almond and carob trees, typical of the Algarve countryside, predominates.”

Photography by Fernando Guerra FG + SG

“This Swimming Pool Sits Comfortably In The Countryside Of Portugal.” Accessed September 16, 2015. http://www.contemporist.com/2015/09/10/this-swimming-pool-sits-comfortably-in-the-countryside-of-portugal/.

Two Atlanta-Based Designers Create An Architecturally Inspired Dog House

Atlanta-based design firm, Pyramd Design Co., have created their first offering, The Puphaus.

The designer’s description

Emerging from the musings of two designers who were disenchanted with their respective industries, dog-loving founders Roy Fleeman and Zach Griggs set out to create products they had a personal connection to and could see through from initial conception to final production.

With backgrounds in graphic and industrial design, the multi-disciplinary duo decided to design & build something for man’s best friend: the Puphaus. Time to ditch the plastic igloos and give our pups some stylish new digs.

Taking queues from modern home design, naturally-derived materials were chosen that would look and feel at home in any outdoor setting, while coming together to make a head-turning architectural statement. Staying true to form-follows-function, stainless steel food & water bowls are incorporated into the floor panel while a floating roof design enhances air circulation on those hot summer days.

Once Western red cedar and Portland cement board were selected as the primary materials, Pyramd fell in love with the combination and began drawing up different designs, ultimately manufacturing Puphaus in their hometown of Atlanta.

Puphaus’ unique construction allows it to flatpack for affordable shipping, and once unboxed it can be easily assembled in five steps without any tools. Now Spike and Leo have a sweet new place to rest their paws – and their humans have barely broken a sweat.

Two Atlanta-Based Designers Create An Architecturally Inspired Dog House. (2015, July 2). Retrieved July 5, 2015, from http://www.contemporist.com/2015/07/02/two-atlanta-based-designers-create-an-architecturally-inspired-dog-house/

Family Home in Vietnam With Lovely Pockets of Greenery: BQ-17 Residence

23o5Studio completed the design of BQ-17 Residence, a contemporary home located in an uncrowded neighborhood of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The design was adapted to the living needs of a couple and their three children, while taking in consideration the laws of urban planning. Local legislation required to leave 2.5m (8ft) front and 2m (6.6ft) behind the house, which somewhat challenged the initial plan of developing the construction more horizontally. According to the project developers, the solution was to “build interleaving spaces, which have different foolproof, placed around a central vertical space”, thus creating voids and connections between rooms.

Minimalism is the key feature of this residence; yet, quite a few elements stand out: “Seen from outside, the house has simple lines, yet strong enough to combine cubes as a sculpture. Lot of squares, with different sizes and free layout, joined with graceful greenery to attract people and make them curious about entering inside. The squares become highlighted from the front door to the central block. They do not only get natural light for the house, but also create an aesthetic effect at night.” By employing wood extensively for the furniture elements, doors, floors and central staircase, the designers achieved a welcoming family atmosphere-have a look! [Photography by Quang Tran]

Family Home in Vietnam With Lovely Pockets of Greenery: BQ-17 Residence. (2015, June 23). Retrieved June 24, 2015, from http://freshome.com/family-home-in-vietnam-with-lovely-pockets-of-greenery-bq-17-residence/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: FreshInspirationForYourHome (Freshome.com)

Farmhouse by A.D.D. Concept + Design

Photography courtesy of A.D.D. Concept + Design

Farmhouse by A.D.D. Concept + Design (Farmhouse by A.D.D. Concept + Design)

https://homeadore.com/2015/05/12/farmhouse-add-concept-design/


Replacing a Burned Down House Surrounded By Experimental Vegetation: GK House

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Located in the historic district of North Carolina’s Chapel Hill town, the GK House sits on a 1.5 acre site sloping from east to west. Accessible via an easement through an adjoining property, this imposing structure gathers wood, stone and glass in a contemporary display of architecture. Originally part of the Coker Estate, where amateur botanist Dr Coker composed a distinctive collection of plants derived from his experiments, the house sits surrounded by woods and greenery that offer an original outdoor experience. Constructed after the sketches of Raleigh- based Kenneth Hobgood Architects, the residential structure replaces the original house that burned down to the ground and took part of the vegetation down with it. Collaborating with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburg, architects managed to revive the grounds and compose a bright, cheery and stylish set of interior and exterior spaces, as you can see in the photos.  (Teicu)

Teicu, Ada. “Replacing a Burned Down House Surrounded By Experimental Vegetation: GK House.” Freshome Design & Architecture. N.p., 12 Aug. 2012. Web. Web. 12 Aug. 2012.


Fragmented House / AQSO Arquitectos

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Architects: AQSO Arquitectos – PE. Pinés & Jové
Location: Laguna de Duero, Valladolid, Spain
Ground Floor Area: 200 sqm
Completion: 2012
Photographs: AQSO Arquitectos

‘Arquitectos Office’ (AQSO) has recently completed the construction of the ‘Fragmented house’. The concept solution for this residence starts from a compact block transforming, after several divisions and shifts, into an external broken-down form, result of the arrangement of the interior spaces.

The house is located near Laguna de Duero, a town situated in the municipality of ‘Tierra de Pinares’, in Valladolid. The building is orientated facing west and distributed in two levels: living room and day use spaces in the ground floor and master bedroom upstairs. The form is conceived as a series of juxtaposed elements defining the different atmospheres and spaces.

Therefore, the entrance is demarcated by two parallel blocks and another recessed one working as main access. The front part of the house, facing the garden, is marked out by the cantilevered block where the bedroom at the upper level is located, in contrast with the one of the ground floor. The rear of the house, where the garage can be found, is made up of several stair-shaped elements.

Inside, the living and dining rooms are linked into an open and continuous space just partially blocked by a stone masonry wall and the freestanding staircase giving access to the upper floor. From the master bedroom, provided with a generous walk-in wardrobe and ensuite Jacuzzi, it is possible to access the roof, partially used as terrace with a small solarium.

The façade is made by big scale matte ceramic pieces combined with stone masonry walls, inside there is a predominance of light colors in walls, floor, doors and windows. In the front garden of the house there is a slender swimming pool with spa and an independent block facing the yard with a wide bay window to be opened and converted into a summer house.

King , Victoria . “Fragmented House / AQSO Arquitectos” 15 Mar 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 19 Mar 2012. <http://www.archdaily.com/216755&gt;