minimal | clean lines | lack of ornamentation | contrast | revealed structure | innovative | undisguised materials | functional | playful | open floor plan | contemporary l |iving with nature | organic | non-traditional | pure form | timeless

Archive for November, 2011

pay attention to small details

The importance of details in interior decoration

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

When designing or decorating a home it’s always important to pay attention to small details. Of course, the other elements like the color theme or the big furniture are also important but it’s often the little details that make the difference between a bright and fun home and a beautiful but boring one.

When I say small or little details I don’t necessarily refer to the actual size. Such detail can also consist in the texture or color of the floors for example or in the way the pattern from the wallpaper matches the furniture. When you usually find yourself in the spot when you’ve done everything you had to, you’ve furnished and redecorated the house but there’s still something missing, that means it’s time to add some more details.

This means you can add some colorful pillows on the sofa for example. This would add some color and would also make the room seem more inviting. Also, you could choose some pictures of artwork to display on the walls. Flowers are also a common choice when it comes to decorations.In the end, the most important thing when decorating a home is to be careful at the way the materials combine and the way the colors and textures work together. Make sure they don’t clash and always try to see beyond the obvious.  {found on Alhvem}

(Ganea)

Ganea, Simona. “The importance of details in interior decoration.” Homedit. N.p., 25 Nov 2011. Web. 26 Nov. 2011. http://www.homedit.com/the-importance-of-details-in-interior-decoration/.

 


Haifa House by Pitsou Kedem Architects

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

A private residence built in the center of a historic avenue and at the very heart of Haifa’s French Carmel neighborhood.

The avenue is studded with a number of residences designed in the Bauhaus style. The Bauhaus style gained its hold in Israel in the wake of international styling trends and is a ornament free design style, both simple and down to earth. The style celebrated the aesthetics of the machine and was characterized by uniformity of color and by unassuming and simple finishes and facades. The style faithfully represented the spirit of the age and the location. This project, designed decades later, creates a line that connects contemporary styling with the spirit of that bygone era.

The project emphasizes and sharpens the differences between apparently similar design styles of contemporary minimalism influenced by Japan and the austere moderation of the modernism that characterized the end of the 1950?s. Both of these paradigms translate into a way of life, to the Israeli environment and climate. The sophistication and the minimalism that existed at the heyday of the Bauhaus period have been translated, in this latest reincarnation, into a spacial purity and prestigious restraint.

In his design, the architect has expressed his own, localized interpretation for free planning in which there is a spacial continuity achieved through light, appearance and movement and the placement of secondary spaces around one, large and open central space. The architect has succeeded in creating the experience of continuous, intimate and defined spaces with different levels of symbiotic, mutual interaction with the central space and yet without detracting from the overall understanding of the structure. Despite the intensification of the residences central space which finds expression in a double sized open space reaching the entire height of the building with one completely transparent façade facing the direction of the courtyard, through the use of controlled and restrained formality and the use of materials with no external facings, the designer has succeeded in showing his belief that it is possible to create a residential space of quality and timelessness.

In an attempt to connect with the historic avenue and the houses that have inhabited it since the 1950?s, the architect has paid great attention to homes front facing façade. The front of the building is almost anonymous, for the most part, a closed element, free of unnecessary ornamentation and one that combines a monochromatic color scheme based on the grays and whites that characterized that same era. Only the floating upper roof hints at a harmony with contemporary design. There is a sense of acceptance of the avenues importance and an attempt to assimilate into its, fragile and gentle structure and in no way try to force contemporary architecture on the surrounding environment. Only the floating mass of the roof hints that, despite the desire to be part of the avenues context and the spirit of that historical period, it is clear to the observer that here we have a bold attempt to create an architectural language that leaves a clear signature and the fingerprint of the designer.

The home was, as said, designed around a wide, high public space that constitutes the connecting point and provides a view of all of the homes different wings as well as to the central courtyard and the pool. In order to further strengthen the impact of the central space it has been coated with exposed concrete panels and a large library on the wall as a central motif. A large, ribbon window allows light to enter deep into the space, creating movement and dynamism on the central wall. The architect has covered all of the structures spaces with an expansive roof which appears to be suspended, weightless in the air and floating effortlessly with no apparent means of support. The roof frames and consolidates the various parts of the structure with the apparent dissociation between the roof and the building creating an impressive, formal dialogue.

Movement within the house is accompanied by different views of the outside environment; exposed and open areas and other areas that are framed and focused on a specific view that was designed specifically for that area. The underlying concept of the homes design is one of quiet and formal restraint; the home is a place of tranquility and calm where the minimalistic details, the clean language and the meaning, separate the residents from the world outside. The architecture and the interior design combine a climatic relationship with light and air, an expression of the homes functionality and the uniform design lines both internal and external.

The materials and the colors used for both the interior and the exterior range from white to gray combined with wooden strips. The simple, clean shapes and the light play a central role in the interior design. Shade and light create ever changing performances of shapes and movement, “playing” on the walls, the ceilings and the floors of the building throughout the day. The combination of the geometric light shows against the horizontal and vertical surfaces, made from many different materials, creates a unique atmosphere in the internal spaces and the house’s exterior that make a powerful statement of uniformity and calmness. During the day, natural light entering the residence and its movement creates absorbing light shows. At night, when darkness falls, artificial light, and especially the light seeping out from the pool, create within the structures spaces a totally different atmosphere, one that is almost mystical and magical.

The design of the courtyard is characterized by the same restraint of form with the choice of trees and their placement also communicates with the avenue and the surrounding environment. And so, despite the fact that different worlds and different eras exist in the space between the historical Bauhaus of the avenue and that of this modern and minimalistic home, there still exists a relationship between them, a feeling that one is not strange to the other.

“Haifa House by Pitsou Kedem Architects.” Contemporist. N.p., 22 Nov 2011. Web. 24 Nov. 2011. http://www.contemporist.com/2011/11/22/haifa-house-by-pitsou-kedem-architects/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: contemporist (CONTEMPORIST).

 


A mix of mid century modern and bohemian.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

  Images: Bethany Nauert

House Tour – Lindsay’s Modern Bohemian in Silver Lake

Name: Lindsay Marcus
Location: Silver Lake — Los Angeles, California
Size: 800 square feet
Years lived in: 8 months — rent

Lindsay’s lovely bright apartment sits on a hill in Silver Lake and serves as a home and music studio. New to Los Angeles, she was lucky enough to find a bright airy space to hold all her vintage finds and East Coast memories.

Lindsay wanted to move into a home that embraced the Los Angeles sunshine and offered a sprawling view. She explained she was thorough in her search and needed enough room to work from home. As a musician and composer she has set up camp with all her equipment right in the living room. Lucky for her, the built in shelves and desk offer alternate ways to save space and in return gain more storage. “Most of what I have in my apartment I brought from Brooklyn. That said, the interaction with the outdoors is much more pronounced here, and the arid climate inspires you to open your home more to the outdoors and incorporate natural elements in one’s designs.”

When starting all over in a brand new home, there are many ways to approach your design. For Lindsay the most essential part in designing a home is “being aware of how the pieces and colors in your home work together as a whole.” I believe that what she has created is a home that honors the memories she’s carried along the way. Even some of her treasured art pieces are tiny notes or mementos. Mixing vintage, flea market scores and modern decor — she has a cozy, warm space to dwell in.

My Style: A mix of mid century modern and bohemian.

Inspiration: Brooklyn, old treasures, the hills where I live.

Favorite Element: The items in my home that were given to me by friends, and the various items that remind me of different stories and periods of my life.

Biggest Challenge: Creating a space with style and finding pieces that resonate with me and work within the overall scheme while remaining within a smaller budget. That said, I love the challenge and excitement of finding great pieces and accents on a dime.

What Friends Say: I love your place!

Biggest Embarrassment: My love seat. I brought it with me when I moved to LA from NY because I thought it better to have something than nothing… but I still haven’t replaced it. Hope to soon.

Proudest DIY: I designed my dining table with a wonderful craftsman who lives in the east village in NY. We worked together on all of the specs and dimensions, and I love how it came out.

Biggest Indulgence: Fresh flowers.

Best Advice: Take your time collecting pieces you love.

Dream Sources: My dream sources are my current sources – basement finds, thrift stores/vintage furniture boutiques, flea markets, and local artisans.

(Nauert)

Nauert, . “Lindsa’ys Modern Bohemian in Silver Lake .” Apartment Therapy . N.p., 21 Nov 2011. Web. 22 Nov. 2011. http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/la/tours/lindsays-modern-bohemian-silver-lake-home-house-tour-161349.

 


Lucy Chadwick · A Selby film for ZARA

Simple and cozy … from loft to the barn, from city to country living.

 


Practical Outdoor Table Upgrade

After a hard and tiring working day you begin to think of a nice way of ending your day. You may have plenty of options and one of them is to call your friends and invite them at your home. These moments of relaxation are always welcome.

You may surprise your friends in a nice manner by presenting them an interesting idea that can be put into practice really easily .For our moments of relaxation become complete we invite our friends to sit at a practical outdoor table with a nice upgrade design. Around this table we can sit chatting; playing some cards or we can just simply relax. We may also have a nice dinner and for a delicious meal a nice glass of wine is always a great company. As a perfect hostess we should be prepared with all sorts of good quality bottles of wine for our guests. We should also bare in mind the fact that wine must be always cold.

So a simple solution seems to help us create this practical outside table upgrade where the central part of it was replaced by a metal gutter in order to create a built-in drink chiller. Here you can put some ice and your bottles of wine and thus you will get the certitude that besides a high quality wine you will have a cold one too. {found on tumblr

(Strachinaru)

Strachinaru, Simona . “Practical Outdoor Table Upgrade.” Homedit. N.p., 19 Nov 2011. Web. 20 Nov. 2011. http://www.homedit.com/practical-outdoor-table-upgrade/.

 
 
 

De Tafelwip Will Make Your Relationships Stronger

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you are bored of the conventional dining tables and you are looking for a playful and fun furniture piece then you will definitely like the one we present today.

De Tafelwip is a strange and unusual concept from Marleen Jansen: a wooden see-saw attached to a simple table. By bringing a playground classic to your dining room you can enjoy some nostalgic moments. On the other hand, the Dutch designer wanted to emphasize the basic principles of eating etiquette and sharing meals together. Eating at this table will force you and your partner to stay seated until the end of the meal. You need to avoid any sudden moves otherwise the other person could end up on the floor along with the food. There is no doubt about it that De Tafelwip will put your relationships to the test and might even make them stronger.  (LASER)

LASER, . “De Tafelwip Will Make Your Relationships Stronger.” Tevami. N.p., 19 Nov 2011. Web. 19 Nov. 2011. <http://tevami.com/2011/11/19/de-tafelwip-will-make-your-relationships-stronger/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: tevamisite (Tevami – Modern Furniture, Home Furnishings, Contemporary Furniture)>.

 


IKEA Small Spaces – Small ideas

Small ideas are about finding and using hidden spaces and choosing furniture that does more than one thing. It’s about being creative, a little rebellious and doing what you dream about no matter how much or how little space you have. And we think that is a pretty big idea.


adding color and pattern

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

When it comes to color, I’m a middle of the road person. While I admire people who go for the gusto with four walls of bright, bold color, I’m more in tune with moderated uses. Accent walls deliver a robust dose of color with less work, more flexibility and require slightly less color confidence. In other words, they’re perfect for lazy, timid, commitment phobes like me.

I rounded up twenty rooms to inspire readers who are looking to incorporate more color in a room, but who aren’t quite ready to take the 4-wall plunge.  As you can see, wallpaper is as effective as paint in adding color and pattern on an accent wall and walls with paint treatments like stripes and chevron equal more than the sum of their parts.

(McBride)

(Images credited in the original posts)

McBride, Carrie. “Accentuate the Positive: 20 Colorful Accent Walls.” ohdeedoh. Apartment Therapy , 15 Nov. 2011. Web. 15 Nov. 2011. <http://www.ohdeedoh.com/ohdeedoh/color/accentuate-the-positive-adding-color-with-accent-walls-160212&gt;.


Express your tastes and your personality…

RENOVATION TIPS by Design Uniform

Renovating your apartment is an exciting process. You are able to express your tastes and your personality. Your emotional well-being improves in a new, fresh environment. If you own the apartment, you will most likely add value to it by renovating it.

Keep in mind though, that renovations rarely go smoothly and are without problems. Below we list several issues that may arise. We believe that being prepared for those challenges will help make your renovation go as smoothly as possible.

The Budget

Plan your budget carefully. The main reason for underestimating the cost of the renovation is underestimating the amount of work involved. This is especially true for bathrooms and kitchens, where a lot of the work will eventually be hidden from view. This may include but not be limited to relocation of plumbing lines, installation of plumbing fixtures, electrical wiring, framing of wall areas in preparation for recessed cabinets or wall hung toilets.

The Contractor

The most important decision that you will make in the renovation process (following the decision of your design of choice) is the selection of the right contractor. Regardless of how extensive the renovation is, it is crucial that you have a contractor who performs quality work, but that is a person with whom you can also communicate well. Please see our tips on how to select a good contractor here.

Time

When will the renovation start? How much time will it take to complete? Discuss these questions with your contractor prior to signing the contract. The answers to these questions depend on the contractor’s availability, the number of people that will be working on the job at any one time, the hours in which the work can be performed, and of course the project’s size and complexity. Be prepared, however, that renovation projects sometimes run late, because of so called “unexpected field conditions,” delays in material deliveries, and other unpredictable circumstances. Always give your schedule some latitude – for example do not plan to move into your apartment on the day after the renovation is supposed to be finished.

Bids

The industry standard is to ask at least 3 contractors to price your job. This way you will assure that you are getting the best and competitive price. The contractors should meet with you and look at the apartment prior to giving you a price, so they can asses existing conditions which may have an influence on the price. Ask the contractors to list what they understand the scope of the project is. Also ask them to give you a bid with numbers broken down into categories, i.e. electrical work, plumbing, fixtures, accessories, tile work etc. This way you will be able to compare apples to apples when it comes to comparing the bids from various contractors.

Know what you are getting for your money

We realize that reading design drawings may not be your forte, but we encourage you to make an effort to understand what is included in the design documents, and request that the entire scope illustrated in the documents is accounted for, priced, and built by your contractor.

Negotiate

At least give it a try. Of course negotiations are possible only prior to contract signing.

The Contract

The expression “contractor” derives from the word contract and for good reason. It is extremely important to have a written contract in place with your contractor (builder). Depending on the size of the job, the contract may range in size from a one page document (for a small size bathroom) to a multi-page document with many appendices and riders. You can prepare the contract yourself, or purchase and fill out a document from a design association. Make sure that the contract contains at the minimum the following information:

  • The client’s (your) name and the address of the renovation
  • The contractor’s name and address
  • The total cost of the project
  • The schedule of the project (when will it start and how much time will it take to complete)
  • The scope of the project. This can be a description of what needs to be done. Do reference the design documents you have – this way they become part of the contract and the contractor is obliged to follow them. Be as specific as possible. (For example you can state: Scope of work is to complete a bathroom renovation, including removal of existing fixtures, accessories, lighting, tile etc, and installing new fixtures, accessories, lighting, tile etc as shown on design documents 1-8 attached to this contract).
  • Work excluded from the contract. You may be supplying some of the items listed by yourself or through a vendor. Those items should be clearly listed.
  • A payment schedule. Usually the contractor requires a deposit to start the work, and then receives one or more payments while the work progresses. Never pay the contractor the full amount until the work has been completed and inspected by you and you find it satisfactory. This is the best and often only way to make sure that your work will be completed!
  • Any other information that may be important for the project, for example that the contractor must follow renovation rules required by your condominium association, that work must be performed by licensed individuals, that the contractor must carry a certain amount of insurance, etc. For larger renovations we do recommend that you purchase a contract prepared by a professional association, which has a lot of the above information already built into the document.

Changes

If you want to make changes in the design – try to make them before you sign your contract with the builder. Changes during the course of construction may be very pricy, but sometimes unavoidable. A document that lists additional cost due to a change is called a Change Order. Request that the contractor issues a Change Order and you approve it before the contractor proceeds with the additional work.

Permits

The work you are performing may require permits by your city or county agencies and/or by your condominium/coop association. Make sure you have all paperwork and permits in place before the work starts. For city/county permits you will most likely need the services of a registered architect.

Materials

Purchase or have your contractor purchase all materials prior to renovation so that there is no stopping once the project starts.

Samples

Request samples of tiles. Keep in mind natural stone varies as it is a natural material. Some stones are more uniform than others.

Supervision

If you hire an architect or designer, their scope of services usually includes construction supervision or observation. If you did not retain a professional for this purpose, you will need to perform supervision yourself. Stop by on a regular basis and observe the quality of craftsmanship, the speed in which the work progresses, and whether you can spot any problems, errors or omissions.

Something goes wrong

Even highly experienced professionals who have been working in construction for many years will agree: mistakes happen. To avoid disappointment try to understand that this is normal. Usually the contractor will admit that he made a mistake and will fix it at no additional cost. However, you will want to carefully watch what the contractor is doing, and notify him immediately if you think something is wrong. Changes are much harder to make and much more costly if they are discovered at a later time.

Payment

Request a waiver of lien for each payment you make. As mentioned above, the final payment should be made after you have inspected the completed work and are satisfied with it.

Uniforn Design. (n.d.). Renovation tips. Retrieved from http://uniformdesign.us/renovationtips.php


Instant Bath Remodel

Contemplating a bathroom update but short on time, money, and energy? New York–based designer Magdalena Keck (a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory) and architect Urszula Bochinska founded Uniform Design to expedite the process and to make it more affordable. The duo provides designs, materials, and finishes for four styles of bathrooms: loft, minimalist, naturalist, and townhouse; they’ll even help you hire a contractor. The price for the design starts at $250 for the Basic Package. Go to Uniform Design for more information.  (Christine, 2011)

Photography by Jeff Cate.

Christine. (2011, November 11). Remodelista [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://remodelista.com/posts/architect-visit-instant-bath-remodel-by-uniform-design?utm_source=Remodelista Daily Subscriber List&utm_campaign=bf969b3153-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email


Split-level Modern House Design

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Modern house design built on urban lot with dimensions of 6 x 24 m. This modern house designed in open-plan, a transparent style, lighted and ventilated at the front and back. The house exterior structure is cubic-like, full of large glazing windows and structured by steel reinforced concrete cast and slabs in prefabricated concrete. The interesting design idea of this modern house design is the interior design layout that has split-level. Split-level interior structure developed to organize 150m2 volume because it’s sloping terrain and spacious interior needed. The interior distributed in over half levels and create a three story zone of building volume with beautiful unclear floor interior division. Both exterior and interior has wooden and iron elementals, combine with rawness of concrete this modern house is simple and economical but looks beautiful. First floor split-level spaces are containing kitchen-dining room and half-level is for living room and entrance area, while all infrastructures including water tank, heating and sewage treatment system placed in lowest level of the ground. Nest to kitchen-dining is simple modern outdoor garden. Second floor level for space between area and bedroom&bathroom. Third floor level area contains workspace office with compact library and master bedroom suite (including bathroom), and the half level is outdoor terrace to capture the city landscape beyond.

Year: 2008.

Area: 150 m².

Architects: Apiacás Architects.

Structural design: Mr. Mesquita Maria de Lourdes.

Hydraulic and electrical design: Ramoska Castellani and Designers Associates Ltd..

Illumination design:Ricardo Heder – reka lighting.

Photos:Pregnolato Kusuki & Photographic Studio.

archinspire, . “Modern House Design Split-level Beautiful Unclear Floor Interior Division.” Home Design Ideas | Decorating | Gardening. Web. 15 Nov 2011. <http://archinspire.com/home-design/modern-timber-house-renovation-beautiful-landscape-site.htm&gt;.


living spaces with the outdoors while maintaining privacy…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Description from the architect:

Modest houses on small lots comprise the Quillen’s Point neighborhood, adjacent to the Chesapeake Bay in Ocean View, Delaware.  An eclectic mix of houses, gravel roads ending at the bay and wooded lots provide a nostalgic, informal setting for this new house.  The project site is near the end of Burbage Lane, the second lot from the bay with expectations that the adjacent waterfront lot will eventually be developed.

In an effort to integrate living spaces with the outdoors while maintaining privacy from Burbage Lane and neighboring houses, the scheme is organized around a centrally located garden.  With sixteen foot high ceilings, the eastern volume contains the public living spaces. Continuous clerestory windows assist in providing an abundance of natural light into the space, allowing views to the treetops and sky while minimizing the close proximity of the adjacent houses.  A twenty foot wide glass wall slides into a pocket, enhancing the relationship to the outdoors, and provides a sense of living in a garden.  The two story western volume is comprised of bedrooms and a small second floor living space.  A one story glass link connects the volumes and visually opens to the central garden.

The house was conceived as two simple, flat-roofed volumes, varying in height, intersecting and overlapping a one story circulation space which connects the volumes.  The east volume is constructed with cement board, the west volume with corrugated siding and the one story connecting space with the ground face concrete block.   The exterior material palette is quiet and subdued. Materials are selected for their expected long term durability, ease of installation and initial cost. The impact of the one story horizontal volume facing the street is intended to reflect the scale of neighboring structures while the narrow two story volumes are oriented perpendicular to the street reducing their apparent scale.

This house is designed in strong counterpoint to many of the houses built in the last era of abundant resources, expensive materials, and limitless floor area. The house is not large; it comprises three bedrooms and 2400 square feet.  The house is constructed with modest materials that include concrete floors throughout the first floor, oak flooring on the second floor and plastic laminate and oak millwork.

The house was designed to achieve a balance between recognition of the picturesque Chesapeake Bay landscape and a more intimate, secluded garden environment. Expansive openings to the private garden combined with smaller, selectively oriented openings toward the greater landscape allow for a sense of privacy while maintaining a sensibility of direct connection to the rhythms of nature.

Dave. (2011, November 12). Lujan house by robert m. gurney [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://www.contemporist.com/2011/11/12/lujan-house-by-robert-m-gurney/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed: contemporist (CONTEMPORIST)